Archive
FOTO Jazz

EstherCidonchayGeorgeCables2012

Esther Cidoncha

 

 

Share
Read More

Eddie Henderson

 

© by Esther Cidoncha

Share
Read More

 

Esther Cidoncha

Share
Read More

 

 

 

Photo © by Esther Cidoncha, 2013

Una noche espléndida de verano, en uno de los mejores clubes de Nueva York, en el Dizzy’s Club Jazz Coca Cola. Vistas impresionantes a Central Park. Conciertazo, copas. Un local más que recomendable. Imprescindible.

Ali Jackson, batería
Vincent Gardner, trombón
Sherman Irby, saxo alto,
Russell Hall, contrabajo
Emmet Cohen, piano

Dizzy’s Club Jazz Coca Cola, New York, 7 de agosto de 2013

 

 

Share
Read More

Photo © by Esther Cidoncha, 2013

 

 

Share
Read More

 

photo by Esther Cidoncha, 2013

 

 

 

 

Share
Read More

Photo © Esther Cidoncha

 

Share
Read More

Photo © Esther Cidoncha

 

Ron Carter is among the most original, prolific, and  influential bassists in jazz. With more than 3.500 albums to his credit, he has recorded with many of music’s greats: Tommy Flanagan, Gil Evans, Lena Horne, Bill Evans, B.B. King, the Kronos Quartet, Dexter Gordon, Wes Montgomery, and Bobby Timmons. In the early 1960s he performed throughout the United States in concert halls and nightclubs with Jaki Byard and Eric Dolphy. He later toured Europe with Cannonball Adderley. From 1963 to 1968, he was a member of the classic and acclaimed Miles Davis Quintet. He was named Outstanding Bassist of the Decade by the Detroit News, Jazz Bassist of the Year by Downbeat magazine, and Most Valuable Player by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences.

In 1993 Ron Carter earned a Grammy award for Best Jazz Instrumental Group, the Miles Davis Tribute Band and another Grammy in 1998 for Call ‘Sheet Blues’, an instrumental composition from the film ‘Round Midnight. In addition to scoring and arranging music for many films, including some projects for Public Broadcasting System, Carter has composed music for A Gathering of Old Men, starring Lou Gosset Jr., The Passion of Beatrice directed by Bertrand Tavernier, and Blind Faith starring Courtney B. Vance. Carter shares his expertise in the series of books he authored, among which are Building Jazz Bass Lines and The Music of Ron Carter; the latter contains 130 of his published and recorded compositions.

Carter earned a bachelor of music degree from the Eastman School in Rochester and a master’s degree in double bass from the Manhattan School of Music in New York City. He has also received two honorary doctorates, from the New England Conservatory of Music and the Manhattan School of Music, and was the 2002 recipient of the prestigious Hutchinson Award from the Eastman School at the University of Rochester. Most recently he was honored by the French Minister of Culture with France’s premier cultural award–the medallion and title of Commander of the Order of Arts and Letters, given to those who have distinguished themselves in the domain of artistic or literary creation and for their contribution to the spread of arts and letters in France and the world.

Carter has lectured, conducted, and performed at clinics and master classes, instructing jazz ensembles and teaching the business of music at numerous universities. He was Artistic Director of the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz Studies while it was located in Boston and, after 18 years on the faculty of the Music Department of The City College of New York, he is now Distinguished Professor Emeritus although, as a performer, he remains as active as ever.

 

ok, a detail:

Yes, Jim Hall & Ron Carter – Alone Together.

Alone Together is one of the great duet albums in instrumental jazz. Guitarist Jim Hall and bassist Ron Carter are renowned as both studio musicians and members of stellar outfits (Hall played with Jimmy Giuffre and Art Farmer; Carter with Miles Davis’s second great quintet). In the intimate, chamber-jazz atmosphere of these live dates, however, the true sensitivity and flexibility of both artists can be heard. Carter and Hall are sophisticated, harmonically advanced players. They value balance and space as much as technical showmanship, and both play with a cool tone and rhythmically intricate flair that scintillates as it soothes and seduces.
The majority of the program consists of standards (“Autumn Leaves” and “Prelude to a Kiss),” along with other covers (Sonny Rollins’s “St. Thomas”). Hall contributes an original, the smoky “Whose Blues,” as does Carter, with the sly bop flourishes on “Receipt, Please.” Throughout, the music is playful, highly lyrical, energetic, and beautiful, while representing an almost uncanny telepathy between the two performers. Aside from faint crowd noise from the club audience, this album is perfection.

cd

 

 

 

Share
Read More